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Thursday, 3 December 2015

The active learning classroom, 8 essential elements

https://globaldigitalcitizen.org/active-learning-classroom-8-essential-elements?utm_source=Global%20Digital%20Citizen%20Foundation&utm_campaign=5adad03b83-MAILCHIMP_LIST&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f244ccc9d2-5adad03b83-189128741&mc_cid=5adad03b83&mc_eid=a6281d6d5a

Friday, 27 November 2015

When we fail a child

http://pernillesripp.com/2015/11/27/when-we-fail-a-child/

Automation is eating jobs

http://singularityhub.com/2015/11/19/automation-is-eating-jobs-but-these-skills-will-always-be-valued-in-the-workplace/#.VlAkrRKDxhc.twitter

Tuesday, 24 November 2015

Why NZ Shouldn't Copy Asia on High Stakes Testing

Dr. Zhao has been presenting his latest research "lessons that matter: What should we learn from Asia's school systems,"  at the Global Education Leadership Partnership (GELP) event which is being hosted by New Zealand for the first time ever. 
http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon/audio/201780163/why-nz-shouldn't-copy-asia-on-high-stakes-testing



Developing a collaborative learning environment in partnership with students

http://elearning.tki.org.nz/Teaching/Snapshots-of-Learning/Developing-a-collaborative-learning-environment

Change

I have read this article with interest as I reflect on the change at our school. I believe it is time to lift the expectation. Our Curriculum has been in our school for the last three years. There are some areas where we need to lift our practice. there are some I do. Who holds me accountable. I hold myself accountable but why is no one else? There are bigger areas to be addressed though. Perhaps.


 "This concern cannot be completely solved but there needs to be a balance between supporting the school’s priorities and individual teacher priorities. If leaders are faced with teachers that do not wish to support the school’s direction and goals, then direct feedback needs to be given; the difficult conversation cannot be avoided."

 http://connectedprincipals.com/archives/12109

Thursday, 17 September 2015

In response ~ Journalists love a bit of scaremongering and in many ways I can't help feeling that the reporting of a recent OECD report on the impact of technology on results is just that.




Wednesday, September 16, 2015

"Tech doesn't improve student results - study" - why news reports like this are damaging (and missing the point).

Source: TV3 News

Journalists love a bit of scaremongering and in many ways I can't help feeling that the reporting of a recent OECD report on the impact of technology on results is just that. As I read news report after news report last night (many of which seemed to be either directly taken from Reuters or an OECD press release with little or no critical analysis) I could nearly hear the shrieks of delight from the pearl clutching naysayers bubbling with excitement at the "evidence" that, clearly, change is bad.

Now don't get me wrong, I have no issue with the report itself, or the fact that the OECD are looking at the impact that tech has on results such as PISA. Look at the actual OECD site and it is interesting reading (you can also see the full report here), their discussion actually focuses on the need for a "new approach needed to deliver on technology’s potential in schools" - and they are absolutely right. Technology integration needs to be strategic and needs to look past the "dazzle" that tech can provide and focus on the enrichment, extension and support only a technology rich environment can provide. I heartily encourage educators to incredibly critical about how and why they plan to introduce and integrate tech into the classroom.

What does concern me is that the vast majority of the reporting is misleading and completely overlooking the real value of tech in the classroom.

Firstly, there is the issue that the fact they are trying to link the use of tech to improved test outcomes is problematic at best. Has anyone looked into the impact of using biro and refill on test outcomes? Technology or pen and paper can both be used effectively or ineffectively, the fact that you are using either tool is not necessarily relevant to a test that measures Maths, English or Science. The fact that the students are on a computer for any amount of time tells us nothing about how pedagogically sound the use of the tech is. Stick a kid in front of computer without pedagogical approaches designed to leverage the advantages of working online and of course they are going to be distracted by the "dazzle". Compare this with teachers who are using traditional modes such as direct instruction and rote learning, wheeling out a pedagogical approach that has been honed over the last century, (with little regard for learner engagement or agency) and of course you will probably get better "test results". The relevance of said tests for measuring success in a 21st Century context could also be bought into question...but I fell that probably calls for a dedicated blogpost.

Secondly, there is the issue that the way this report has been summed up by most news agencies really does miss the point about why it is is so very important that tech is integrated (effectively) into teaching and learning across the board. The advantages of tech integration is rich and varied. Most importantly it is about providing young people to the opportunity to develop the skills they will need to thrive in the 21st Century. There are many reasons for integrating tech (which have little to do with test results) and quite frankly if we ignore these we potentially short change an entire generation of young people.

Below are just a few reasons why I believe every school must be looking to integrate tech effectively.

Learner Agency 
See my earlier post here. Learner Agency is the idea that the learner has a sense of ownership and control over their own learning. The word 'agency' is defined as "action or intervention producing a particular effect", so I guess if we apply this to the learner, it means they engage in a particular action or trial an intervention which then produces a particular effect. In the context of a school this might involve students taking action, whether it be through reading, researching, discussing, debating, experimenting, making or tinkering and as a result, gain (through their own efforts) new understanding and new learnings. This being a shift from the notion of teachers, teaching at the student and fundamentally providing all of the knowledge and content which they then transfer to the the empty vessel. And as I stated in my earlier post, genuine learner agency can really only be achieved where tech is accessible.

Introduce one to one devices or BYOD and actually give students the freedom to use technology in a variety of ways - not just a glorified exercise or text book. There is no question - all students having access to a browser is incredibly liberating if you just shut up and get of the way and let them go explore and actually use more than just the latest app or platform you've stumbled upon. Technology is not actually about improving grades, it's actually about improving agency (and hopefully greater agency should then result in better outcomes).

World Trends
Core Education explore a wide range of world trends to bring together an annual summary of trends pertaining to ICT use in education. These provide an excellent starting point that go beyond our own experiences or opinions and encourages us to consider what these trends might need for our learners. We need to consider also the period in which we actually live. Our ancestors came through an Agrarian (agricultural) age where the ability to farm and work the land was essential. Our parents and maybe even we have come through an Industrial Age where the need for industrial and technical skills were very important. We are now entering what is referred to as a Knowledge Age defined on the NZCER Shifting Thinking website as

"a new, advanced form of capitalism in which knowledge and ideas are the main source of economic growth (more important than land, labour, money, or other ‘tangible resources). New patterns of work and new business practices have developed, and, as a result, new kinds of workers, with new and different skills, are required."

and as they also state

"Knowledge Age worker-citizens need to be able to locate, assess, and represent new information quickly. They need to be able to communicate this to others, and to be able to work productively in collaborations with others. They need to be adaptable, creative and innovative, and to be able to understand things at a ‘systems’ or big picture’ level. Most importantly, they need to be to think and learn for themselves, sometimes with the help of external authorities and/or systems of rules, but, more often, without this help."
These are our students, and many of these skills are best learned in an online space - this is where they can, very quickly, locate, assess and present information. Tools such as Google Docs is what enables them to collaborate and co-construct anytime or anywhere. Blended Learning is key to enabling learning that meets the demands of a 'knowledge' rather than 'industrial' age.
Research Findings
Research by it's very nature is backward looking, so it is important that we do not sit back and wait for the evidence that e-learning is effective before we even deign to dip our toes. It can be tempting to simply say there is not enough evidence yet. However I would suggest that whilst relatively small there is plenty of compelling evidence and research available. This is particularly true if you look at the evidence gathered as a part of 'Teaching as Inquiry' projects where e-learning has been a focus. Literature reviews such as Noeline Wright's 'e-Learning and implications for New Zealand schools: a literature review' brings together a wide range of findings. In her conclusion Wright highlights a wide range of potential benefits, ranging from motivation and engagement to the development of critical thinking and multiliteracies. It is important to remain critical about the benefits of ANY pedagogical approaches, not just the e-learning ones. We seem quick to defend traditional methods and modes when there is little more evidence that they are in fact effective. For this reason it is important that we reflect on all of our approaches, gather pre and post data and feedback from students to ensure that all practice is indeed evidence or research based. We need to ensure our practice (and the research we base it on) is actually current and responsive. It is not okay for teachers to base practice on an approach that might have been exciting when Pong was a cutting edge video game.

NCEA
Many would argue that NCEA is actually an argument for protecting the mighty 'paper and pen', indeed external exams are written by hand...for now. In April 2013 NZQA's Dr Karen Poutasi stated in a speech to SPANZ "we are reasonably confident that we can reach a position within 8 years where most students will be sitting examinations using a digital device." That means your Year 1-4 student will most likely be sitting their exams online. Our Year 9 students will most definitely be creating and submitting internal assessments online. To do this well, and to ensure our learners gain the skills they need to gain Excellence or at least achieve the very best results they are capable of, then we need to give them practice. More than that, we need to be explicitly teaching them, or giving the time and space to develop the skills to do this well. Learners will need to be able to locate, synthesize and present information. They will need to be able to do it safely, lawfully and effectively. This takes time. We need to start now. In fact all students need to have started yesterday.

Differentiation and Universal Design for Learning
There is also the fact that pedagogically speaking the integration of tech is actually a no-brainer. We have a responsibility to ensure they way in which we facilitate learning and gather evidence of said learning is inclusive. All students have a right to learn and enjoy success, therefore we must be meeting the needs of a diverse group - not just the select few that learn the way you do or did in your day. Consider differentiation as defined by Carol Ann Tomlinson which seeks to provide a range of learning opportunities differentiated for student readiness' learning style and interest. This is possible in a paper based classroom, but choices will still be limited and controlled by the teacher and the resources made physically available to the learner. You might provide a small range of different activities and maybe texts that a either written or more graphic based. Consider this now in a blended learning environment where if a student can access the Internet they can access unlimited resources - written, visual and oral. A teacher may well need to support a student in locating appropriate material or may even curate a collection for them. The speed and ease in which differentiated learning can be facilitated in a blended environment is incredibly enabling. If a teacher can also let the student take the lead and have the power to negotiate methods and modes for learning and evidencing learning,, then you on to something quite magic. Similarly if you consider the diagram below with a blended learning lens it is again a no-brainer. As stated on the Cast website

" Universal Design for Learning was initially is a set of principles for curriculum development that give all individuals equal opportunities to learn. UDL provides a blueprint for creating instructional goals, methods, materials, and assessments that work for everyone--not a single, one-size-fits-all solution but rather flexible approaches that can be customized and adjusted for individual needs." 

Who wouldn't want this for their learners? Providing multiple means of representation (of information), means of expression (evidencing learning) and means of engagement is nigh on impossible in a purely paper-based classroom, and again it limits it to a single teacher perception of what they think they know about the students ability, learning style, interests or even their mood or tiredness on any given day.

So as you can see, whilst tech doesn't necessarily (in and of itself) improve test results, it can (if used effectively) improve outcomes in a much richer sense of the words. The reason that such shallow and often lazy reporting of such "studies" upset me so much is that it can make the desire for educators to embrace change even harder than it already is. I do wonder if the authors of these news report realise the collateral damage of attention grabbing headlines and shining the light on the aspects of the report that fuel the fire of traditionalists yearning for "evidence" to drag their heels even more. In an earlier post I explored the challenges educators face innavigating the space between education al paradigms and if if I'm honest, lazy (or at least superficial) reporting of genuinely interesting studies are just resulting in a whole raft of nervous educators who managed to take "two steps forward" probably just retreated a sh#tload of "steps back".

Wednesday, 16 September 2015

Guided Reflection: How Can We Use Metaphor to Reflect on Learning in a Meaningful Way?

Guided Reflection: How Can We Use Metaphor to Reflect on Learning in a Meaningful Way?

This is quite a cool read all about Learning.
I think about
we expand our understanding
and then we act, trying something new with the learning
learning is change
Learning sparks intrigue, curiosity, and delight, offering many choices and modes of experience.


Learning is a process with two key phases: action and reflection.

We have an experience, we reflect on the experience, we expand our understanding by making new connections, and then we act, trying something new with the learning. Teachers describe this as instruction and assessment. Instruction is the action, the doing, the experience. Assessment is reflecting on the impact of the learning on the self or the student.
The current model for learning design in Ontario schools is to begin a new lesson with a Minds On task, something to trigger prior knowledge or spark curiosity. Then we move to the Action part of the lesson, the things the students are doing to learn the new skill or explore new knowledge. The students own the learning, the teacher facilitates the process. Finally, there is Consolidation, a chance to reflect on the learning, to see where it fits in the students’ understanding of other things, and to decide on next steps.
We can all engage in action and reflection whether we are learning formally through a course or teaching ourselves how to bake.
  • Self: When I am learning something new, how do I build reflection into the process?
  • Teacher: How do I balance instruction and assessment?
  • Leader: How do I share my learning process with staff and students?

Learning feels like a rollercoaster.

When we learn our energy is affected. Learning is change. Sometimes we feel excited and positively energized by learning and sometimes we feel frustrated and negatively bogged down by learning. It’s normal to feel a combination of both when we are learning something new. In fact, the best learning happens when we feel a combination of familiarity and disorientation, clarity and confusion.
I always know I’m learning when I get angry. Typically I’m not an angry person so when I feel my emotions shifting I know I’m being pushed out of my comfort zone to a more vulnerable place. The challenge and conflict can overwhelm me. I wonder how an hour ago I felt so confident and how now I feel like an absolute mess. But inevitably when I stick with it a path out of the pit emerges and I climb out of the darkness into the light a new woman.
  • Self: How can I sustain my focus during the difficult parts of learning, when I’m in the pit surrounded by darkness
  • Teacher: How can I teach my students perseverance?
  • Leader: How can I leverage motivation and purpose to inspire staff to accept the learning challenge and better cope with the stresses that come with change?

Learning looks like a carnival.

Learning sparks intrigue, curiosity, and delight, offering many choices and modes of experience. Carnivals invite us to enjoy them on our terms, spending our time (and money) where we want whether we spend hours at the dunk tank or the ring toss or equal amounts of time at each feature. They support individual experiences and collective experiences.
When we really look at learning there are many things going on at once. Individuals make choices constantly about what they will embrace and what they will resist. We learn for ourselves and our own gain, but we also learn in relation to the energy of the group surrounding us.
I’ve been in workshops where the collective vibe was resistance and there was low engagement. Was learning happening? Were we going to take these ideas back to our schools to implement in our classes? Probably not.
Then I’ve been in workshops where the collective vibe was encouraging and there was high engagement. It made me want to take more risks, plunge into new layers of thinking, and make connections between the experience in the room and my classroom.
Learning is most impactful when there is a high level of engagement, collective enthusiasm, and individual choice.
  • Self: What motivates me to learn something new?
  • Teacher: What does a high level of engagement look like in the classroom?
  • Leader: How can we mobilize our school communities to generate more collective enthusiasm?

Learning tastes like my cooking.

If I learn slowly with careful preparation and attention to detail the rewards are far greater than when I learn quickly. Fast learning is about as good for us as fast food. It fills an immediate need but it doesn’t provide the value of a healthy, home cooked meal. In today’s world we need both types of learning to suit different needs. Fast learning is figuring out how to use social media to find and connect to friends. Slow learning is figuring out how to sustain lasting friendships.
Fast learning is reading the latest news about global learning. Slow learning is reflecting on how global warming affects my life and what I need to do to have a lighter footprint.
The Information Age has overwhelmed us with constant, ubiquitous fast learning. It’s such a blessing to have access to knowledge on anything at the press of the button. But as individuals, teachers, and leaders we need to persist in the pursuit of slow learning, of reading to understand, of thinking critically about the information and its implications to our lives.
My cooking is as good as the time I spend doing it. Meals that take hours to prepare are far more nourishing and memorable than meals that took minutes to toss together. When we feel tired and sick, we often look to our diet, making changes to invite more energy. Let’s apply that idea to our learning. When we feel stuck and we are not seeing progress in our work and our lives and our projects, then let’s look to our learning. Slow learning is about the process, the journey, the intentional steps toward a goal. Begin with the end in mind and work backwards. Create a learning plan, like a recipe, that shows a singular focus, a sequence of steps, and a desired result.
  • Self: What does my current learning diet mostly consist of, fast learning or slow learning?
  • Teacher: How can I create conditions in my classroom to nurture slow learning?
  • Leader: How can I model slow learning for staff in the pursuit of my individual learning goals and our school learning goals?

Learning moves like a spiral.

Learning is continuous, expanding, and moving. Each time we learn we open up more opportunities for learning something else. Lessons repeat over time, bringing us deeper into our understanding. The learning spiral moves through our days from birth to death, affecting our choices and values and relationships.
From the earliest humans, we’ve collectively learned about technology, each century evolving into more refined methods of efficiency and effectiveness. As a species we reflect on what went wrong in previous generations to try and make better decisions in this one. The same lessons repeat year after year, decade after decade; they always have and always will. Learning is the soul of evolution and learning is our gateway to personal and collective change. Learning is natural.
Malcolm Gladwell famously wrote about 10,000 hours of practice making an expert: slow learning over time with action and reflection. Our school curriculums are designed to support this idea. Last year our school focused on strategies for multiplication. Every class from Kindergarten to Grade 8 did a multiplication task, modified to grade level, about the number of muffins the baker made. It was amazing to see the continuum of learning spread out in front of us in the student work. As the students got older, their strategies for problem solving were more sophisticated. Even though they may have solved a similar problem seven years prior, Grade 8 students now solved the problem in a different way that accommodated more complexities. And these students will continue to learn about approaches to problem solving (whether in math or life) beyond the walls of our school.
  • Self: How have I learned about problem solving over the course of my life? What do I still need to learn?
  • Teacher: How can I use metaphor as a way to support my students in reflecting on their learning in a meaningful way?
  • Leader: What problems need solving in my school? In education generally? What is my first step toward finding solutions?
This article was first published at Sunshine in a Jar: Taking the Lid Off Learning.
Learning moves like a spiral.-2

Sunday, 30 August 2015

Finding Solutions. TO OLD PROBLEMS, DESIGN THINKING

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2015/08/28/can-design-thinking-help-schools-find-new-solutions-to-old-problems/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+kqed%2FnHAK+%28MindShift%29

Tuesday, 25 August 2015

What's lost as handwriting fades?

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/03/science/whats-lost-as-handwriting-fades.html?_r=3

Thursday, 6 August 2015

Sruggling mathsSeeing Struggling Math Learners as ‘Sense Makers,’ Not ‘Mistake Makers’

A very interesting article. Fits with the professional learning I have done around open ended questions. Also my thinking around my struggling maths students and the need for them to work out what problems are asking them to do and use a calculator to actually solve the equation they may have to come to from the word problem.

Monday, 3 August 2015

Developing Learner Agency

As I continue to look at developing student agency in my class it is good to listen to other school's explain their developments. This is especially interesting as this is a secondary school. We have had parents inquire into our practices and how will this prepare them for future schools. This trend is moving into the secondary schools as we all undergo a shift realising the skills and attributes we need to develop and foster in our students is something different to prepare them for their world. The older traditionally style of learning and teaching was not going to brig out the skills and dispositions needed by the 21st century learner and citizen.
Learner agency at Hobsonville Point Secondary School from EDtalks on Vimeo.
Claire Amos talks about fostering agency at Hobsonville Point Secondary School. Claire says is agency is about students owning their learning. She describes how a sense of ownership and taking responsibility for learning is incorporated into the culture of the school and into the programmes they offer.

Friday, 31 July 2015

Learning from discussions on conflict

https://www.graphite.org/blog/learning-from-conflict-discussing-controversial-issues-in-the-classroom?utm_source=Digital+Compass+Now+Available+on+Mobile&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=weekly

Tuesday, 28 July 2015

Compliant children

I have often talked about compliant children and how these may be the children some teachers want. They are easy, they don't rock the boat. They work 'hard'.

This article is talks about conditioning students to school. It talks about the need for students to take risks. A great article to read.

http://connectedprincipals.com/archives/11730


Saturday, 18 July 2015

Learners in the driving seat

Have read this before but after looking at TeachMeetNZ  and viewing this bloke's presentation I reread it. I was very intetested in his topic ..looking at learner agency in the earlier years.

This article continues to validate my TAI this year and where i am trying to head. Will comment more on this later within my Inquiry blog. ( This does need updating.)


Friday, 10 July 2015

effective-teams-schools-emotional-intelligence

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/key-effective-teams-schools-emotional-intelligence-elena-aguilar?utm_content=blog&utm_campaign=key-effective-teams-school&utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=socialflow&utm_term=link

Karen sent me this link today. It really resonates with what I see and think is part of our school's culture.How to address this is the big issue. We need a combined strength.

1. Meeting protocols are established and someone is the keeper of these

2. Accountability measures are put in place to ensure new initiatives are well underway and meet the school expectation. It appears to be that for a long time accountability was not there, challenging conversations have not been had, so when one occurs hackles rise and people do not know how or try to respond well.

3. Because mediocre practice has been allowed or not even expected when Professional earning asks us to reach a higher step it is beyond the comprehension of those who have only ever asked mediocrity of themselves and have not been challenged.

Thursday, 25 June 2015

From Emma Winder ..changing roles of teacher and learner

http://my-learning.me/2015/06/24/what-is-the-teachers-role-and-the-students-role-in-a-modern-learning-environment/


Perhaps the greatest change in schools today is not the integration of technology, not the way classrooms are being built, not even the changes in curriculum and assessment, but that the role of the teacher in the classroom is being transformed in ways that we're not fully aware of or ready for. To be effective in the midst of such change teachers need to become more critically reflective, being open to examining the deeper assumptions they have about what they are doing and why they are doing it.

2010 Ten trends: Changing role of teachers and learners from EDtalks on Vimeo.


Michael Fullan: Technology, the new pedagogy and flipped teaching

Tuesday, 23 June 2015

Effective Teams and Leaders

Effective teams and leaders. What can we learn from chickens and coffee breaks?! JUNE 22, 2015 ~ EMMAWINDER25

relational Trust and moving forward together


This post posted by Emma but all,about effective schools is well worth a listen and a read.




Saturday, 20 June 2015

The deconstruction of the Teacher

Interesting enough I have had a few discussions around this over the last few months. I am already seeing the ways I can facilitate learning in my class. Roles of the learner and the teacher are changing.

 http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/03/the-deconstruction-of-the-k-12-teacher/388631/ 

Further redaing http://www.core-ed.org/thought-leadership/ten-trends/ten-trends-2010/changing-role-teachers-and-learners 

http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/teacher-blog/2013/jun/18/technology-transform-teaching-students-schools http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/03/the-deconstruction-of-the-k-12-teacher/388631/


 Supporting future-oriented learning & teaching — a New Zealand perspective Report to the Ministry of Education R Bolstad & J Gilbert with S McDowall, A Bull, S Boyd & R Hipkins


 Theme 4: “Changing the script”: Rethinking learners’ and teachers’ roles Twenty-first century ideas about knowledge and learning demand shifts in the traditional roles or “scripts” followed by learners and teachers. If the purpose of schools is not to transmit knowledge, then teachers’ roles must be reconceived. Similarly, if the learner’s main job is no longer to absorb and store up knowledge to use in the future, then learners’ roles and responsibilities also need to be reconceived. This calls for a greater focus on recognising and working with learners’ strengths, and thinking about what role teachers can play in supporting the development of every learner’s potential. 9 Ministry of Education (2007b) Supporting future-oriented learning and teaching — a New Zealand perspective 5 The idea of changing the scripts for learners and teachers is often shorthanded with phrases such as “student-centred pedagogies” or “student voice”, alluding to the need to engage learners (and their interests, experiences and knowledge) in many decisions about their learning. However, the idea of sharing power with learners can be met with resistance, particularly if this is interpreted as an “anything goes” approach in which learners are given complete freedom to set the direction for their learning. The challenge is to move past seeing learning in terms of being “student-centred” or “teacher-driven”, and instead to think about how learners and teachers would work together in a “knowledge-building” learning environment. This is not about teachers ceding all the power and responsibility to students, or students and teachers being “equal” as learners. Rather, it is about structuring roles and relationships in ways that draw on the strengths and knowledge of each in order to best support learning.

Too Quick to Label Children.

http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/2015/jun/20/secret-teacher-too-quick-label-children-arent-perfect-adhd-dyslexia

but-the-kids-arent-reading-20-ideas-for-creating-passionate-reading-environments

http://pernillesripp.com/2015/06/18/but-the-kids-arent-reading-20-ideas-for-creating-passionate-reading-environments/

Thursday, 11 June 2015

Don-t-let-evidence-stifle-innovation-in-education

https://www.edsurge.com/n/2015-06-08-don-t-let-evidence-stifle-innovation-in-education

Friday, 5 June 2015

Sugata Mitra: Build a School in the Cloud

Educational researcher Sugata Mitra is the winner of the 2013 TED Prize. His wish: Build a School in the Cloud, where children can explore and learn from one another.

Why you should listen

Educational researcher Dr. Sugata Mitra’s “Hole in the Wall” experiments have shown that, in the absence of supervision or formal teaching, children can teach themselves and each other, if they’re motivated by curiosity and peer interest. In 1999, Mitra and his colleagues dug a hole in a wall bordering an urban slum in New Delhi, installed an Internet-connected PC, and left it there (with a hidden camera filming the area). What they saw was kids from the slum playing around with the computer and in the process learning how to use it and how to go online, and then teaching each other.

The "Hole in the Wall" project demonstrates that, even in the absence of any direct input from a teacher, an environment that stimulates curiosity can cause learning through self-instruction and peer-shared knowledge. Mitra, who's now a professor of educational technology atNewcastle University (UK), calls it "minimally invasive education."
At TED2013, Sugata Mitra made a bold TED Prize wish: Help me build a place where children can explore and learn on their own -- and teach one another -- using resouces from the worldwide cloud.

What others say

“Education-as-usual assumes that kids are empty vessels who need to be sat down in a room and filled with curricular content. Dr. Mitra's experiments prove that wrong.” — Linux Journal



Self Organised Learning Environments


Friday, 22 May 2015

Flipped classroom/Self Management/Student Voice

http://www.teacherstandards.aitsl.edu.au/Illustrations/ViewIOP/IOP00173/index.html


This is a great video ..it's apparently on Youtube as Maths on Youtube. But's it about effective teaching, flipped classroom and student voice.

A little of what I am starting/wanting to do.

This comes from

What good teaching looks like?

Friday, 15 May 2015

12 Rules of Great Teaching from ~ http://www.teachthought.com/

This is such a good post. Everyone should read it. It makes me think about my holding students accountable to finishing all their must dos. I'm in a dilemma. Part of what I wanted to do was to make sure the tasks were valuable to that particular child's learning pathway. This is in my TAI. 

I'll put this article there too. (http://merrylteachingasinquiry.blogspot.com/)

I want my students to be able to have a longer time span on tasks they need a longer time for. I want them to be able to negotiate a task and then not have to feel if they put effort into this they will still have to do all the musts dos or be finished for not completing the tasks. ( As in normal rooms)

So ..how much do a need to hold my students accountable?

My first thinking was to have just a few must dos so they had to design their own tasks ..and there is the answer ..reduce the number of tasks. 

Everyone should follow this blog


12 Rules Of Great Teaching

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flickeringbrad-empathy12 Rules Of Great Teaching
by Terry Heick
Recently, I’ve been thinking of the universal truths in teaching. Students should be first. Don’t always start planning with a standard. Questions matter more than answers. Trust is a currency of a human classroom.
So I thought I’d gather twelve of them to start with. The idea of “good teaching” is an idea we get at a variety of different ways, So then, here are some rules we might consider when making sense of this idea of what makes a teacher great.
1. Start small.
This is how great things are built. Curriculum. Relationships. Portfolios. Take your time–this is a marathon, not a sprint.
2. There is no one way.
Learning models, for example, are the new teaching strategy.
Traditionally, teachers focus on “strategies” to “teach.” Reciprocal teaching. Lit circles. Accountable talk. Of course, these have value.
But the modern approach should have as much to do with what students access, when, how, and why as it does with “what students do in the lesson.” Self-directed learning. Scenario-based learning. Project-based learning. Inquiry-based learning. Game-based learning. These are the strategies that matter first. 
3. Trust the people around you.
Your students, first and foremost. But this goes for parents, and colleagues as well. It may not always work out the way you want, but if you’re the only one in control, there will be a net loss of capacity for the ecology of learning you participate in and serve.
4. In learning, curiosity is everything.
If you can’t make them curious, teach something else. I’ve theorized that there are stages to curiosity–and even things that make students curious. as well.
Taskmasters seek compliance. Good teachers seek engaged students. Great teachers–somehow, some way–find out what makes students click, and use it.
5. Experiment. Experiment. Experiment.
Teaching is a craft. Play with it. A little more of this, a little less of that. This new tool. Start here instead of there. Try this instead. Throw this out. Welcome this in.
Not only does this keep things fresh for students, but it keeps you sharp and relevant as an educator as this big world keeps on turning.
6. Don’t always start planning with a standard.
Know that it’s okay to think technology-first. Or curriculum first. Or standards. Or data. Or (ideally) student-first. There are dozens of ways to plan content. What matters is the power and sustainability of the learning as it manifests in the classroom.
7. Teaching is always changing.
Technology. Curriculum. Assessment. The value systems of students. Since these are always changing, your teaching be should as well.
8. Be concise.
When explaining, less is more.
9. Know your pedagogy.
Know the difference between confusing and complex. Between differentiation and personalized learning. Between project-based learning, and learning through projects. Between difficulty and rigor.
Between standards and curriculum. Between teaching and inquiry.
10. Help students ask great questions.
This can happen by modeling them, celebrating them, assigning points for them, curating and publishing them–whatever you can do to help students see what a great question implies. Here are 8 strategies to help students ask great questions, for starters.
11. Be interesting.
Be unpredictable. Challenge authority. Connect with students both through your teaching and in lieu of your teaching. Begin class with a bang–a crazy idea, interesting story, great song, funny joke. That said…
12. It’s not about you.
So don’t be the center of attention. Charismatic teachers are great–everybody loves them–but if your voice and personality dominate the classroom on a daily basis, things are out of balance.
Bonus
Here are 3 more to consider.
13. Love your content.
Stay up-to-date on changes. Be aware of the tricks, shortcuts, and interesting quirks of the content you teach. While teaching isn’t about content, mastery here can make everything else easier.
14. Be your students’ biggest cheerleader.
The be-tough-for-their-own-good bit may work for some, but celebrating kids works for everybody.
15. Learning should disrupt. (Read more here.)
Knowledge gained should result in personal change rather than mere academic progress. It should result in personal change for each student–and thus social change for all of us as a society.
If we build great schools and fill them with great technology and great teachers, but still send students home with no hope for the future–home to communities full of poverty, racism, intolerance, greed, waste, and apathy toward local ecologies, with no sense of place, historical legacy, or local and digital citizenship, then we know we have an institutionally-centered system.
When beautiful things happen–things we never could’ve imagined–both inside and outside the classroom, we’ll know we’re headed in the right direction.